About Murray Grant

Murray was born and brought up on El Karama Ranch, a working property that combines wildlife protection with holistic cattle ranching. Based in the Laikipia region, one of Kenya’s most diverse and successful areas, Murray has access to the some of the worlds’ most unusual wildlife experiences on his doorstep.

Murray was born and brought up on El Karama Ranch, a working property that combines wildlife protection with holistic cattle ranching. Based in the Laikipia region, one of Kenya’s most diverse and successful areas, Murray has access to the some of the worlds’ most unusual wildlife experiences on his doorstep.

A self - taught sculptor with no formal art schooling, Murray credits his remote upbringing in the Kenyan bush with a rancher father and a wildlife artist mother ( Guy and Lavinia Grant), as the ultimate cornerstone for his life as an animal sculptor.

Creative Process


Murray’s technique combines the old and the new; employing anatomical study and field sketching as often as many fascinating new technologies available to the modern sculptor.

Projects are painstaking; involving months of research often in far-flung corners of Africa and beyond, wherever his wildlife subjects are best observed. Murray’s upbringing surrounded by the wildlife he is most often sculpting means he is well prepared for furthering his hands-on study of African game. Whether from his customised Land Cruiser mobile studio or on foot at home or further afield Murray places a great emphasis on familiarising himself with the behaviour, ecology and conservation status of his particular muse.

A background layer of information forms a foundation for the hours of field sketching and photography, anatomical studies and often, depending on the cryptic nature of his subject, camera trap work that might take months to yield the necessary data. Perfect examples of these would be the critically endangered Kenyan Mountain Bongo, the huge leopard that share their remote mountain habitat and the Mountain Nyala of the Ethiopian Highlands.

Murray accepts commissions from private collectors, but also works on projects of his own like the Spiral Horned Antelope Of Africa series, portraits of big ‘Tusker’ elephants of Kenya and his eternally elusive muse the Leopard.

The pieces are often portraits of specific individuala, which is a further demand on Murray’s skill in his quest to realistically portray the finest of Africa’s fauna.

In the finish of each piece is evidence not only of an in depth knowledge, but also a deep understanding , empathy and passion for the beautiful animals he is representing through his art.


Murray has access to some of Africa’s best wildlife areas and collaborates widely with the local wildlife authorities to use his research materials in crucial wildlife monitoring and protections programmes.

Using some of the most cutting edge motion sensor cameras, Murray now has archives of research photography on several important species. These images are used by those working in wildlife surveillance to positively identify individuals and territories.


Murray is passionate about his wildlife photography and relies a great deal on the information he collects through his camera work for movement, muscle, skin and other nuanced aspects of the subjects he sculpts.

During his time in the bush he has been able to capture and witness countless unusual and significant wildlife sequences, which he records with still photography and video. Occasionally he produces limited edition prints for sale.